My first-ever printed film stills are part of Filthy Rich, a survey show at the Moore College of Art & Design that features work from the first years of RAIR (Recycled Artist In Residency). RAIR has facilitated more than 40 artist residencies, special projects, and performances since its founding in 2010, including works by Jeff Williams, the Dufala Brothers, Ana Peñalba, and Bryan Zanisnik. On view in Philadelphia until March 11, 2017. 

20th Street and The Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103
Gallery Hours:
Monday – Saturday //  11am – 5pm
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

(Can't make it? Read my little interview about the project in this piece about the exhibition!)

This Is Where Wool Comes From in Middle of Nowhere

Filmmaker David S. Kessler has put together a massive one-day event with curator Kristen Neville Taylor in the wilds of the New Jersey Pine Barrens in conjunction with the release of his beautiful documentary about the Pinelands. This Is Where Wool Comes From will be installed in one of the historical buildings at Whitesbog Village, an early 20th-century agricultural community that was once home to the largest cranberry farm in the state. 

Middle of Nowhere
SEPTEMBER 17, 2016
Whitesbog Village
New Jersey Pine Barrens

This Is Where Wool Comes From at THE BAUHAUS!

This Is Where Wool Comes From recently screened at Backup_Fest, a festival of artist-made films programmed by the students of Bauhaus Universität. Yes, Walter Gropius' Bauhaus, where one of my idols, László Moholy-Nagy, made his experimental films and photomontages!! 

Backup_Festival
MAY 19 & MAY 20, 2016
Bauhaus-University Weimar
Gaswerk Theatre
Weimar, Germany

SATELLITE MIAMI

This Is Where Wool Comes From is screening at SATELLITE Miami.

Thursday, December 3
8 pm - 9 pm
The Hotel
7410 Ocean Terrace, Miami Beach, FL 33141

Happy to be included by curators Kayla Romberger and Caleb Hammond as part of Artist-Run at
The SATELLITE Show, a project helmed by Select Art Fair founder Brian Whiteley and the Tiger Strikes Asteroid family (NYC/PHL/LA) of galleries. SATELLITE will take over a number of unoccupied beachfront properties in Miami Beach for the run of the show. 


RAIR PHILLY RESIDENCY // NOV - DEC 2015

For my RAIR Philly residency, I am teaming up with RAIR cofounder Billy Dufala and DP Paul Hinson to document recycling operations and create some giant, mysterious dust clouds.


AIR TALKS at 18th STREET ARTS CENTER

Trying to "sight-read" a video of a sheep being sheared with Madsen Minax.

Trying to "sight-read" a video of a sheep being sheared with Madsen Minax.

via 18th Street Arts Center

September 22, 2015 | 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm
18th Street Arts Center, Santa Monica, CA
Curator’s Lounge

On September 22, I will be giving a short talk with fellow artist-in-residence Brit Bunkley in the Curator's Lounge, starting with a screening of This Is Where Wool Comes From. We'll be looking at material from the making of Wool, including footage from my guerrilla-style casting session at Skowhegan and rehearsals working with collaborator Madsen Minax.


Fourth Wall at Vox Populi

This Is Where Wool Comes From is installed from May 1 through May 31, 2015, in the Fourth Wall space at Vox Populi. Ryan McCartney reviewed the show for Title Magazine

OPENING RECEPTION: MAY 1, 6 - 11 PM
319 NORTH 11TH STREET
3RD FLOOR
PHILADELPHIA, PA

New Works: CINÉ-ROMAN 

VIA BOWERBIRD

Bowerbird Presents GATE gave me the opportunity to organize this screening program of film and video works, many of them newly commissioned, responding to the use of photographic stills in our time-based medium. 

Bowerbird Presents GATE
APRIL 17, 2015

@ The Rotunda
4014 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA
8pm; FREE

ABOUT THE EVENT
Chris Marker made his groundbreaking work La Jetée, a moving-image film made up of still photographs, in 1962, and it still stands as the most iconic ciné-roman in the canon. Many artists have admired Marker's innovative use of photomontage to weave a narrative, yet few have contributed to the genre. Curated by filmmaker and visual artist J. Louise Makary, New Works: CINÉ-ROMAN will include works, most of them newly commissioned, by a diverse group of artists experimenting with movement, time, and stillness in film and video. In addition to featuring new animated and choreographic video works, this evening-length program will showcase new works by several collaborative teams of filmmakers working with photographers, including one with a live musical component. New Works: CINÉ-ROMAN aims to flood the field with fresh takes on this underexplored form.

WORKS BY
Mark Tumas & Tamara Suskic 
Slater Bradley 
Johnny Woods 
Barb Choit & Alex Tyson 
Matt Porterfield 
anastasia owell 
Matt Sanchez 
Faye Driscoll with Lily Baldwin 
J. Louise Makary & Jor Kane (live) 
Alessandro Zangirolami 
Jesse Alexander Madden Harding (live) 
Alexis McCrimmon 


RAIR (Recycled Artist in Residency)

VIA RAIR PHILLY, FEB. 14, 2015

I'm very excited (!!!) about my upcoming residency at RAIR Philly, slated for October/November 2015! RAIR will offer me the unique opportunity to shoot a quick-and-dirty experimental narrative project in a facility that receives, sorts, and recycles tons of cast-off materials and trash. 

A magical mound at RAIR Philly.

A magical mound at RAIR Philly.


ANNOUNCING THE 2014 PEW FELLOW ARTIST RESIDENCIES

VIA THE PEW CENTER FOR ARTS & HERITAGE, AUG. 12, 2014 

THANKS TO THE PEW CENTER FOR ARTS & HERITAGE, I WILL BE IN RESIDENCE AT THE
18TH STREET ARTS CENTER IN SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA, IN SUMMER 2015.

I'm going to be learning to surf and shooting a land/water video project with surfers who, at middle age, have refined a spiritual philosophy about their sport and lifestyle.

http://www.pcah.us/news/123_announcing_the_2014_pew_fellow_artist_residencies


SKOWHEGAN, SUMMER 2014


PEW FELLOWS FRIDAY: Q&A WITH J. LOUISE MAKARY

VIA THE PEW CENTER FOR ARTS & HERITAGE, FEB. 14, 2014

AS PART OF OUR NEW “FELLOWS FRIDAY” WEB FEATURE, WE FOCUS ON THE ARTISTIC LIVES OF OUR PEW FELLOWS: THEIR ASPIRATIONS, INFLUENCES, CREATIVE CHALLENGES, AND EVERYDAY LIVES. THIS WEEK, WE SPEAK TO 2013 PEW FELLOW J. LOUISE MAKARY, WHOSE WORKS ON FILM COMBINE DANCE, STILL PHOTOGRAPHY, AND EXPERIMENTAL TECHNIQUES, INTRODUCING UNEXPECTED, CHALLENGING ELEMENTS INTO TRADITIONAL NARRATIVE STRUCTURE.

What music are you listening to? Which books are on your bedside table?

I listen to a lot of dance music that won’t be around for very long. Because it’s always the same but always different, it reconciles two different, paradoxical drives—stimulated by the newness, comforted by the predictability. 

I’m reading Tao Lin’s Taipei but I keep losing my place. I’m looking at a book of photography by Yuki Onodera, which includes the series “Portrait of Second-hand Clothes,” and the catalog for Michael Snow: Photo-Centric, a really exceptional exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art that I was lucky to be involved with.

What do you daydream about when you are working?

I daydream about taking my laptop to a sunlit table where there is light breakfast and a smart choreographer to talk to, or where I get to sit in a studio and watch dancers make things. I’m really daydreaming about being a consultant who helps dance makers negotiate the mechanics of film as they bring their own work to the screen. I also listen to music and let cinematic images work their way through the sound. In my daydreams, I say yes to spectacle, yes to eccentricity, yes to transformations. I’d say yes to trash imagery if I knew what it was.

How does residing in this region contribute to your artistic practice?

Before I was invited to collaborate with Landmarks Philadelphia, which runs four historical house museums, I’d never considered making films that deal with colonial history. My long-term relationship with that organization led to a change in my process, moving toward intensive research and engagement with a field outside of film and fine art. I’m not certain that I will continue to make films about public history, but the experience taught me how to engage more deeply with content, starting with ideas that are geographically close to home.

What could you imagine doing if you didn’t do what you do?

Perfumer.

If you could live with only one piece of art, what would it be?

Maurice Pialat’s A nos amours.

What is your favorite title of an art work?

Fiorucci Made Me Hardcore.